Anchor nuts are captive nuts that do not require an ordinary hex nut to tighten an aircraft bolt. They are used when it is nearly impossible to work on the backside of a piece you are bolting. When certain part installation makes hex nut usage unattainable, anchor nuts are the go-to alternative to bolting a piece together from one side only. It is not unusual for a typical all-metal homebuilt aircraft to have more than two to three hundred anchor nuts installed to reach assembly completion.

Anchor nuts can be the only way to make some installations. Frequently affected problem locations are inspection access covers and hatches, cowling attachments, installation of accessories on the firewall, the installation of antennas, propeller spinner/bulkhead installation, the attachment of wing root fairings, and instrument panel installations. Installations that require the use of anchor nuts are called “blind installations” because the opposite side for installing and torquing ordinary nuts is inaccessible.

The two most commonly used anchor nut varieties include the two lug nylon insert locking type and the two lugs all-metal anchor nut. Other less frequently used anchor nuts are the all-metal floating anchor nut, the one lug nut, corner nuts, and even miniature nuts for limited space installations. In the tightest of spots, when the standard two lug anchor nut or even the miniature anchor nut will not fit, use of the corner nut and the one lug anchor nut are your best alternatives.

Basic procedure for installing the 832 anchor nut (the most popular size and easiest to install) is a 5 step process.

  • Clamp assembly and drill ?” pilot holes for aircraft fasteners.
  • Separate assembly.  Aircraft clamps anchor nuts to structure and drill rivet holes.
  • Remove anchor nuts and countersink/dimple rivet holes.
  • Install anchor nuts. Insert rivets and set with a rivet squeezer or rivet gun.
  • Carefully drill fastener holes to size

At Paragon Purchasing, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find the anchor nuts you need, new or obsolete. As a premier supplier of parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries, we're always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7x365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@paragonpurchasing.com or call us at +1-914-359-2001.



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Why do some aircraft feature a small vertical section at the tip of their wings? Well, those upturned tips are called winglets, additions to the wing that are designed to prevent vortices from forming. In this blog, we’ll explore what winglets are, and why they are so important.

The vortices created by wings are essentially miniature tornadoes, formed by the high pressure on the lower surface of the wing that creates a natural airflow that makes its way to the wingtip and curls upward around it. When the flow around the wingtips streams out behind the aircraft while it is in flight, a vortex is formed. These small twisters drain speed from the aircraft, and can be strong enough to actually flip an aircraft if not careful.

This is where winglets come in. The shape of the winglet prevents the airflow from over and under the wing from meeting, preventing vortices from forming. This in turn reduces drag on the aircraft, which results in a slightly faster cruising speed. The greatest advantage winglets offer however, is in fuel savings. In 1976, after that decade’s fuel crisis, NASA aerodynamicist Richard Whitcomb published a paper comparing a wing with a winglet versus one with a simple extension to increase its wingspan. In aerodynamic tests, the wing with a winglet experienced roughly 20% less drag than the wing without. Less drag meant less fuel expended, which meant lower fuel expenses, and cheaper airline taxes.

One major engineering advantage of winglets is that they effectively increase the wing’s aspect ratio, the relationship between its span and its chord (the distance from leading edge to the trailing edge). A longer wing with a higher aspect ratio will provide similar benefits, but longer wings are prone to flexing and need to be strengthened, which adds weight. Winglets provide the effects of an increased aspect ratio, without having to extend the wingspan.

Today, most modern airliners use winglets. The Airbus A319 and A320 have small upper and lower winglets, while the A330, A340, and Boeing’s 747-400 have conventional upper winglets. Boeing’s Business Jet, a derivative of the 737, uses eight foot tall winglets with a curving transition from wing into winglet.

At Paragon Purchasing, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the winglet parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. We’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7-365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@paragonpurchasing.com or call us at 1-914-359-2001.



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A fixed-wing aircraft is an aircraft that achieves flight by using wings to produce lift. They are called “fixed-wing” because their wings are stationary, as opposed to rotary-wing aircraft, which generate lift by rapidly spinning rotors or blades. To work properly, the wings of an aircraft have to attach to a structure. In the case of fixed-wing aircraft, the aircraft wings are attached to the body of the aircraft, known as the fuselage. There are three types of fixed-wing aircraft fuselage structures: Truss, Monocoque, and Semimonocoque.

Truss

Truss type fuselages are made up of a rigid framework of beams, struts, and bars to support loads and forces applied to it. This type of fuselage is usually covered with fabric rather than metal or wood. The frame itself is generally manufactured from steel tubes welded in such a way that any part of the truss can support weight and stress. Truss frames can be made from aluminum, but usually only in very light, single-engine models.

Monocoque

Monocoque, French for ‘single shell,’ use formers, frame assemblies, and bulkheads to give the fuselage its tubular shape. The strongest structural supports are spaced to carry concentrated loads at points where the components such as wings, power plants, and stabilizers are affixed to the fuselage. Because these members are the primary load bearing tools, the skin of the aircraft has to put up with significant stress and keep the fuselage together. This means the key problem in monocoque construction is making it strong enough to withstand extreme conditions without it being too heavy.

Semi monocoque

The semi monocoque was introduced to solve the strength to weight ratio problems experienced by the monocoque. It is the most common fuselage in modern aircraft and features the same structural components of a monocoque, but also has longitudinal supports called longerons. Longerons extend across the frame and help the exterior support bending loads. Another unique feature of semi monocoque fuselages are stringers. Stringers are shorter, lighter versions of longerons that serve a similar purpose. All of these features give the semi monocoque superior strength at a lighter weight.

Most aircraft cabins are pressurized for the comfort of crew and passengers, but this pressure causes even more stress on a fuselage and adds to the complexity of the design. Not only the stress from the differing pressures inside and outside the fuselage, the metal fatigues over time as the interior changes from pressurized to unpressurized. Fuselages are put under a lot of stress during flight, and must withstand it and remain functionally proficient.

At Paragon Purchasing, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the aircraft structural parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. We’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7x365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@paragonpurchasing.com or call us at 1-914-359-2001.


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As with any part that is to be installed on an aircraft, it must meet some type of FAA qualification to be legally installed on aircraft and considered airworthy. An important certification of compliance regarding aviation parts is being approved as a “Standard Part”. Standard parts are components and materials that conform to an established industry or US government published specification. This can mean they meet specifications such military standard, aviation standard, or nas standards, and the qualification and approval of these articles is given by the FAA.

Standard parts are not defined by the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 14, and the FAA has published more non-regulatory interpretations regarding the criteria that must be met. To explain the interpretation in short, a part must adhere to established industry or US Government specifications in regards to design, manufacturing, test and acceptance, and uniform identification requirements. Parts also must surpass other criteria such as performance, testing, and include all necessary information for manufacturing, and more. Originally, the FAA set standard parts criteria as those having to meet specific design, materials, manufacture, and uniform identification, but with the rise of components such as discrete electrical parts, the FAA has also created an interpretation for those based on performance criteria, rather than physical configuration.

With every standard part, they must be manufactured as per published specifications and the set out criteria. Those parts that are manufactured without published specifications are not considered standard parts. An example is with the plethora of parts, such as fasteners that enter the industry every year, it remained difficult to obtain parts manufacturer approval for every unique fastener. To remedy this, the FAA began issuing technical standard orders (TSO) to provide certification for these parts to be produced with approval. The Fastener Quality Act enacted in 1990 also helped to ensure the quality and legitimacy of aircraft fastener entering the commercial market.

In all, it is important to procure and use parts that are standard parts, or hold some sort of approval from the FAA, proving their airworthiness and quality. Certificates for approved parts should be included by the producer of the standard part or parts supplier.

At Paragon Purchasing, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find aviation standard parts you need, new or obsolete. As a premier supplier of parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries, we're always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7x365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@paragonpurchasing.com or call us at +1-914-359-2001.


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Like all powered aircraft, helicopters operate on the principles of lift and thrust. Lift is the force that pushes the aircraft up into the sky, and thrust is the force that propels the aircraft forward. In a fixed wing aircraft, like a conventional passenger jet, lift is provided by the wings, and thrust is provided by the engines. In a helicopter however, both lift and thrust are generated by the helicopter’s main rotor.

The main rotor, mounted horizontally above the aircraft’s fuselage, is arguably the most important part of the helicopter. The main rotor provides the lift and thrust that allows the helicopter to fly, as well as move laterally, make turns, and change altitude. The main rotor is powered by a crankshaft connected to the engine. Key to controlling the main rotor is the swash plate assembly, which consists of two parts, the upper and lower swash plate. The upper swash plate connects to the mast, or rotor shaft, through linkages, and the blade grips, which connect the blades to a hub at the center of the rotor. A nut called the Jesus nut mounts the hub on the helicopter’s mast, and control rods from the upper swash plate connect to the blades. These control rods transfer movements in the upper swash plate to the blades.

Meanwhile, the lower swash plate is fixed, and doesn’t rotate. Between the upper and lower swash plates is a set of ball bearings, and allows the upper plate to spin freely on top of the lower plate. Control rods attach to the lower swash plate, and are connected to the pilot’s controls in the cockpit. Therefore, when the pilot operates the controls, their inputs are transmitted via the control rods to the lower swash plate, to the upper swash plate, then to the control rods that connect to the blades, thus affecting the blades, changing their airfoil, and steering the helicopter.

However, the main rotor spinning generates an enormous amount of torque that, if left unchecked, would cause the helicopter to spin uncontrollably and make it impossible to fly. Russian-born engineer Igor Sikorsky overcame this problem by adding a tail rotor to his design, which would be emulated by the vast majority of over helicopter designs. A tail rotor is a vertically-mounted rotor in the tail of the aircraft, which spins in opposition of the torque generated by the main rotor. This effectively negates the main rotor’s torque, balances the helicopter, and allows it to fly in a controllable manner.

At Paragon Purchasing, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the helicopter parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@paragonpurchasing.com or call us at 1-914-359-2001.


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